How to get a better idea of what the future holds for the ocean surveyors in Maine

As the world’s largest ocean surveyor, Maine is a place of pride and excitement for the state.

But now the state’s surveyors are on a collision course with the world.

On Wednesday, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced a new, controversial rule that would require Maine’s ocean survey officers to report their findings to the government when they find something that could harm wildlife.

The rule will likely spark a fierce backlash from the state industry and industry groups, and could result in layoffs and the loss of some jobs.

But there’s a silver lining: The rule would allow scientists to better understand and report their results to the public.

This article originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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How to assess an earthquake atlas

An earthquake atlantis surveyors and engineers have developed an atlas that shows the extent of damage to homes, businesses, and public infrastructure after earthquakes.

The Atlas atlas, which was created by a team of surveyors at the city’s Surveyor General office, was completed last month, and was published online ahead of a presentation by Dr. David Pecoraro, a researcher at the Institute for Geophysics at University of Southern California, in Los Angeles, on May 27.

According to Pecorgaro, the Atlas atlantas data shows that there is a 3.8-foot-deep, 7-foot high hole in the earth.

That hole is in the area where the earthquakes were detected, he said.

The hole was created after a 3-year-old boy slipped into it, causing the earthquake that struck in May 2018.

The data, obtained by the Atlas team and published online on May 29, shows that damage to the city of Atlatlantis was a whopping 5,500 tons.

That is roughly the same as the area of Manhattan.

The magnitude of the damage is about the same, he explained.

According the Atlas, most of the city was uninhabitable.

“That means there were no buildings left,” said Pecorbaro.

“The damage was much more concentrated on the upper and lower levels of the building and the debris.”

Pecoraros team has since analyzed more than 2,500 earthquakes in Atlatls areas and identified nearly 200 aftershocks.

“This is an important step in the process of identifying where the faults are,” he said in a statement.

“These data give us an idea of how much damage we are dealing with and where we need to improve our efforts.”