How to avoid getting fired in nursing: A guide to nursing jobs

Nursing jobs are filled with the same types of challenges as any other profession, and you’re more likely to be fired if you’ve been injured or if you don’t have the right background, a new survey from the Association of American Medical Colleges finds.

Nursing jobs require advanced training, the ability to speak fluent English and a strong work ethic, but employers are also likely to try to find someone who can fill the role better than you, the association found.

The study looked at 1,003 nursing jobs from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the U.S. Department of Labor.

It found that nurses with more than five years of experience had higher turnover rates than other jobs, but the average turnover rate was just 2.9%.

The most common reason nurses were fired in the past 12 months was being fired because of poor performance, and one-quarter of the surveyed positions were considered to be “low-performing.”

The Association of Health Care Administrators also conducted a survey last year of 1,000 health care administrators, finding that nurses have lower turnover rates when compared to other positions.

The average turnover in health care administration jobs was 4.7% for a full-time employee and 2.5% for an associate.

The survey also found that nursing employees have a higher risk of contracting cancer, with a 25% higher risk for developing leukemia and a 17% higher rate of colorectal cancer.

The CDC says that more than 80% of nurses tested positive for coloreactin, which can cause cancer.

While nursing has always been a challenging profession, it has been improving in recent years.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says the number of people in the United States who have cancer has dropped to a 16-year low, and that there were 632,000 new cases of coliform pneumonia last year.